Tag Archives: Outreach

L’Chaim: Living Music

This August, we set off on another of our successful L’Chaim tours around care homes in North London, offering concerts for Jewish residential homes in partnership with Jewish Care.

The houses were originally set up to provide sheltered housing for elderly Jewish Holocaust survivors or refugees. Each home has a shared space where residents come together to socialise and our concerts help to bring people together in these spaces, helping to reduce feelings of isolation and loneliness amongst the older people.

A string quartet from CLS visited seven different homes, playing a specially programmed concert of classical favourites, lighter popular songs and arrangements of Jewish melodies. The audiences varied in size but staff told us that many residents hear and appreciate the music from their own rooms – some of the audience were so enthusiastic that they couldn’t resist the urge to get up and dance to some of the Klezmer tunes.

We were also lucky enough to hear thoughts and stories from residents in a few of the homes over a cup of tea and cake – it was a privilege to get to know the residents and we’re looking forward to our next tour in November.

Want to know more about our L’Chaim projects? Watch our L’Chaim, Living Music video.


With older people, Holocaust survivors and those who are facing bereavement, our music-making helps to keep memories alive and minds active. Learn more about our Wellbeing through Music projects…

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CLS Patron, Dame Felicity Lott on BBC Radio 3 In Tune

We were delighted that our Patron, Dame Felicity Lott appeared on BBC Radio 3 In Tune this week to talk about her new ambassadorial role with the Orchestra, particularly in relation to our education and wellbeing programme Meet the Music. Performing Schumann and Frank Bridge live in the studio, she talked about the joys she has had with us so far working with young people in our Key Stage 1 education projects as well as her plans for 2015.

You can hear the whole programme on catch up on BBC IPlayer or download the podcast.

Our Principal Conductor and acclaimed clarinettist, Michael Collins was also on In Tune last week (ahead of a concert with the Philharmonia at the RFH). He speaks about his performances, recordings and also his work with us and the direction of CLS. You can listen to this programme here.

A Little Taste of Chef Claire’s Musical Soup

May has been a busy month for the education team here at the City of London Sinfonia with our ever-popular Crash Bang Wallop! family concert at Cadogan Hall on 17 May and various KS1 outreach projects in Tower Hamlets and Harrow. In this blog post, we’ll be giving you a taste of what these projects have been about, with everything from insect sandwiches to musical instrument soup. 

Led by the CLS education team and animateur-in-residence Claire Bloor, our family concerts and education projects are designed to provide an easy and accessible introduction for 3-7 year olds to classical music and instruments of the orchestra. In this series which was all about food, Claire plays a chef whose task it was to cook up the most extravagant musical concoction. A combination of musical flavours (attained from the musicians playing into the pot!), different cuisines (represented by repertoire from around the world) and the audience’s own culinary contributions (in the form of ‘recipe songs’ and ‘dishes of the day’), Chef Claire’s musical soups by the end of the concerts were certainly…..  eclectic! Sharing is caring so in this post, we’ve included some pictures, some (hilarious) lyrics to some of the recipe songs the kids composed as well as some exemplary “Dishes of the Day” from our Crash Bang Wallop! family concert. Enjoy!

N.B. We do not recommend trying any of the recipes included in this post at home. 

 

Recipe Songs

♪ This is the special of the day, but it takes like the floor!
A mixture of slugs and smelly pants and arm pits – yuck yuck! ♪

♫ Something is wrenching on my tongue and it feels an ant.
I fit in some bread and it’s very cold, it’s an ant sandwich! ♫

♪ Slimy, disgusting, super gross. Revolting as well.
Slug-tastic dinner for you to try, it’s gooey and cold. ♪

♫ Pea jelly makes you very ill, it is lumpy and raw.
Water and spice add character but it’s not very nice. ♫

♪ Kiara has made you a nice surprise, taste it – bleurgh bleurgh!
It’s sticky and jagged, it’s horrible and it smells like poo! ♪

♫ I can feel an ant on my tongue, there’s some custard as well.
Everything is mouldy – I feel sick. Pass the bucket right now! ♫

♪ Spiders and webs will make you squirm, so will wiggly worms.
Add in some really smelly pants, it’s an insect sandwich. ♪

♫ Snails and slugs with rotten eggs, they smell stinky and gross.
Ants and potatoes and mash it up. Wait there’s one on my teeth. ♫

Dishes of the Day!

Keep your eyes out for more details for our next Crash Bang Wallop! family concert, ‘Magic and Mischief’ on Saturday 1 November. Booking opens beginning of July! 

The Lullaby Tour October 2013

We are incredibly proud of our Meet the Music outreach initiatives, one of which is our Lullaby Concerts tour which occurs twice a year.  Lullaby concerts bring classical music to children in areas where live orchestral music is a rarity. This series is run in partnership with Orchestras Live, and provides an interactive way of introducing young children (typically under 6) to classical music.

I’m sat in a town hall in Suffolk jam-packed with preschool children and their parents, when a labcoat-clad Claire Bloor appears astride an orange spacehopper, wearing a single yellow glove and brandishing a long green balloon. Moments like this are wonderful reminders that working in the arts is exciting, surreal and, crucially, fun.IMG_0855

The theme of October’s tour was “The Mad Professor” and featured Claire, our wonderful Animateur in Residence, playing the part of an eccentric scientist who tries to build instruments for the Orchestra members. However, this was not just a children’s show with an orchestra in the background. The Orchestra themselves are always complicit in the fun; they have costumes of their own and spend the concert teasing Claire and larking around for the children’s amusement. Claire, seemingly, has boundless energy, making the children (and adults) laugh with delight as she took them through the musical programme. The fact that she is nothing more than a labcoat-wearing blur in eighty percent of the photos I took of her is a further testament to her dynamism (rather than to my poor photography skills).

IMG_0839I caught up with Claire, Gillian (our Education Manager) and our musicians in between concerts, to ask them about what Lullaby means to them and find out about their own childhood experiences of classical music.

AJ: Why is it important to introduce very young children to classical music?
Gillian Hunter: Kids this age don’t have any preconceptions about genres of music, nor are they old enough to worry about what is ‘cool’ – all they hear is music. This is an opportunity for them to be exposed to high quality playing of real repertoire in an environment they wouldn’t normally expect to find it!

AJ: What’s the best thing about Lullaby?
Mark Paine: It’s a lot of fun for the kids, and they get to see exactly how these instruments are actually played – it teaches them about the mechanics of it.

AJ: Is the transition from formal concert playing to these more informal children’s concerts difficult?
Susan Dorey: Not at all! We are, after all, entertainers, and this is just another element of working in the entertainment business!IMG_0857

AJ: What were your first experiences of classical music?
MP: Hearing the pipe organ in church, and being told my legs were too short to play!

CB: When I was five, a girl in my school assembly played the flute and I thought it was the most beautiful thing (probably because it was shiny). I pestered my parents for one and they gave me a recorder instead, which I promptly turned on its side. Eventually they bought me a real flute!

MP: Initially my school in Australia didn’t have a music programme until a new music teacher arrived and wanted to start an orchestra. He gave me a horn to take home over the weekend to try out. By Monday I had figured out how to play a scale and the rest, as they say, is history.

GH: My first experience was a bit mad – my parents signed me up for the Suzuki violin program before I was born! It was so oversubscribed that you had to get in there early to get a place.075_Thurrock, Lullaby Concert_high-res (Paul Coghlin)

AJ: What’s been your favourite Lullaby moment to date?
MP: Talking to the fish during the April 2013 tour.

CB: This tour, it’s when the new instruments come on and I get really excited. Last time, it was wearing flippers and kicking my legs in the air!

But don’t just take our word for it! Have a look at our video from one of last week’s concerts to get a sense of the fun for yourself.

More information about our Lullaby tours, upcoming events, our Community and Education work and our Community Partners can be found on our website.