Tag Archives: Opera Holland Park

OHP 2018: Views from the Pit

It’s been an incredible Season of operas at Opera Holland Park: our fifteenth Season as orchestra in residence. From ‘one of the most moving Traviatas’ (The Mail on Sunday) ever staged to the passionately performed (Opera Today) UK premiere of Mascagni’s Italian verismo, Isabeau, Opera Holland Park’s 2018 Season truly had it all.

‘City of London Sinfonia is getting better year on year’
Seen and Heard International (Isabeau)

Throughout the Season, some of the CLS team have been getting behind-the-scenes insight from City of London Sinfonia musicians, conductors and the Opera Holland Park team, all featured in our Views from the Pit podcast mini-series – available on SoundCloud and Apple Podcasts. There’s talk about the Season’s four productions, insight into the rehearsals and opera experiences over the years, as well as insight into a typical day in the life of a professional musician.

Let us know what you think by giving us a like, leaving a comment or a review. You can also tweet us @CityLdnSinfonia or via Opera Holland Park’s dedicated hashtag for the Season, #OHP2018.

Views from the Pit: episode guide

Episode 1: James Clutton and Matthew Swann

Opera Holland Park’s Director of Opera, James Clutton, and CLS Chief Executive Matthew Swann discuss how Opera Holland Park has evolved over the years, the collaboration between both organisations, making opera more accessible to the widest possible audience and, of course, the four operas performed in the 2018 Season.

SoundCloud | Apple Podcasts

Episode 2: Così fan tutte with the strings

Following 2017’s marvellous interval biscuit talk, violinist Charlotte Reid and violist Matthew Maguire return to our podcast series to talk about Così fan tutte and performing an opera after spending a couple of hours working with children at University College London Hospital. We’re also joined by violinist Gabrielle Painter who describes Isabeau and a typical performance day during an OHP show run.

SoundCloud | Apple Podcasts

Episode 3: La traviata with the brass

Two of the Orchestra’s longest-standing members, French horn Mark Paine and Tuba Stephen Wick talk about the exciting and challenging orchestral moments in Verdi’s La traviata. They also go down memory lane, having both been performing at Opera Holland Park since 2004.

SoundCloud | Apple Podcasts

Episode 4: Ariadne auf Naxos with the woodwinds

The woodwinds are very important in Richard Strauss’ Ariadne auf Naxos – an opera that Principal Oboe Dan Bates has loved for 20+ years. We join Dan and Principal Clarinet Katherine ‘Waffy’ Spencer after a six-hour rehearsal of the opera to find out more about the incredible orchestral and vocal writing in Strauss’ score.

SoundCloud | Apple Podcasts

Episode 5: Opera Holland Park with Brad Cohen

In the fifth and final episode of Views from the Pit, conductor Brad Cohen expresses his excitement about conducting Ariadne auf Naxos at Opera Holland Park, giving insight into the rehearsal process and the challenges of moving Ariadne from Glasgow to London. He also explains what makes opera a unique artform.

SoundCloud | Apple Podcasts


Views from the Pit is presented by Tasha Allery and Gabriele Neuditschko, and features rehearsal footage from OHP 2018 dress rehearsals (Così fan tutte, Ariadne auf Naxos, Isabeau) and OHP 2017 dress rehearsals (Zazà). Images © Ali Wright for Opera Holland Park, 2018.

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Opera Holland Park 2017: Kát’a Kabanová and Zazà

We had an incredible 2017 Season, our fourteenth season as Orchestra in Residence, at Opera Holland Park. And just like with the first two operas, and all British open-air productions, the wind, rain and thunder threatened to overthrow performances in the second half of the Season – but to no avail. Here’s what some of the critics had to say about Kát’a Kabanová and Zazà…

WhatsOnStage (★★★★★) described Kát’a Kabanová as ‘Janáček’s most richly coloured and disturbingly flavoured score’ – with which conductor Sian Edwards agreed in our Views From The Pit podcast. Edwards, in her Opera Holland Park debut, was given full credit by the media, with Seen and Heard International exclaiming that ‘it was Sian Edwards’ conducting that lit the night up, inspiring the City of London Sinfonia to unheard-of heights’, and The Stage (★★★★) adding that ‘she and the City of London Sinfonia convey the score’s atmospheric power with incisive eloquence’.

Classical Source (★★★★★) loved Zazà, Leoncavallo’s ‘curious’ opera, in which ‘City of London Sinfonia and Peter Robinson was on fine form, relishing the music, and particularly well-managed were the off-stage banda and choral moments’, and the Daily Express (★★★★) thought ‘City of London Sinfonia under conductor Peter Robinson brings out the lushness of the score’. Despite Zazà not quite hitting the mark with The Times, other papers such as The Telegraph (★★★★) and The Guardian (★★★★) had plenty good to say about the new production, giving full praise to Peter Robinson’s ‘sensitive conducting’ of ‘Leoncavallo’s skillful orchestration’.

More from the press

Kát’a Kabanová

WhatsOnStage: ‘The belting City of London Sinfonia assails the ear with immaculately dosed helpings of romance and horror; and together with the OHP Chorus, whose members personify Kát’a’s paranoia in movement director Clare Whistler’s mime work, they respond rousingly to Sian Edwards’s rhapsodic conducting…’

The Stage: ‘Making her company debut in the pit, conductor Sian Edwards understands its complex style perfectly, and she and the City of London Sinfonia convey the score’s atmospheric power with incisive eloquence.’

The Spectator: ‘Sian Edwards conducted, and it was baleful, headstrong, ecstatic and raw…’

The Arts Desk: ‘Conductor Sian Edwards leads a well-paced account, nuanced but with no holding back at the searing climaxes… Rather than leitmotifs for the characters, Janáček employs different moods in the music to depict each, and Edwards did an excellent job of delineating these separate styles. She deserves much credit for the success of this revival, as does the entire cast for the compelling musical drama they make of this ensemble piece.’

Classical Source (★★★★): ‘Sian Edwards draws some powerful, idiomatic playing from the City of London Sinfonia, and she is a natural when it comes to releasing Janáček’s fleeting tenderness and realising his extraordinary powers of musical characterisation.’

Opera Today: ‘Sian Edwards drew precise, taut playing from the City of London Sinfonia…’

MusicOMH (★★★★): ‘Sian Edwards’ conducting is excellent, while all of the principals succeed in filling the large tented auditorium to good effect.’

Zazà

The Telegraph: ‘Peter Robinson’s sensitive conducting honours the evanescent fragrances of Leoncavallo’s skillful orchestration…’

The Guardian: ‘Conductor Peter Robinson gets the tricky mix of glitz, sadness and sensuality exactly right.’

Evening Standard (★★★): ‘Conductor Peter Robinson delivers a rousing and, when necessary, raucous orchestral commentary.’

Daily Mail (★★★★): ‘This superb Zazà readily shows off many similar magic moments… There’s some truly beautiful music here, especially for the orchestra.’

Daily Express: ‘The City of London Sinfonia under conductor Peter Robinson brings out the lushness of the score and the Opera Holland Park Chorus supplies backstage bustle, while Louise Winter portrays dipsomaniac mother Anaide.’

The Independent (★★★★): ‘Peter Robinson’s expert conducting is a reminder that Leoncavallo was a resourceful orchestrator as well as a dependable librettist.’

The Stage (★★★★): ‘The City of London Sinfonia’s authoritative playing of Leoncavallo’s appealing and impassioned score under Peter Robinson’s vital baton sets the seal on this worthwhile re-launch.’

Bachtrack (★★★★): ‘Leoncavallo’s score is opulent, rich and melodious throughout, and Robinson conducts it with plenty of accent and a fair degree of precision.’

The Spectator: ‘The strings sweep upwards, the horns surge, and Leoncavallo’s Zaza throws itself into your arms.’

Planet Hugill: ‘…under Peter Robinson’s direction the City of London Sinfonia drew out the beauties of Leoncavallo’s rather luxuriant score.’

From Twitter

CLS to perform in Grenfell Tower memorial performance at Opera Holland Park

Following the tragic fire at Grenfell Tower in Kensington in June, there will be a memorial performance of Verdi’s Requiem held at Opera Holland Park on Tuesday 1 August in aid of the Rugby Portobello Trust, to raise funds for the community. Our musicians, along with the Opera Holland Park Chorus, soloists and conductors, will be donating their time to raise funds for those affected and to support our friends at Opera Holland Park.

The tragedy happened just a mile away from the venue and Opera Holland Park has been directly affected, with a member of their stage team still missing and a number of their community projects taking place in that community. On 23 June, our musicians and the cast of Opera Holland Park’s production of La rondine performed an encore of ‘Bevo al tuo fresco sorriso’ in loving memory of their friend and colleague.


We are pleased to say that the event is sold out and are extremely grateful for your support. Read more about the event, or just donate…

Opera Holland Park 2017: La rondine & Don Giovanni

We’re proud to be performing, as Orchestra in Residence, at Opera Holland Park in their Summer Opera Season once again in 2017. The reviews for the first two operas, La rondine and Don Giovanni, have been so great that we feel a lot like we’re in a Puccini nightclub sequence. Here’s what the critics have had to say so far…

Culture Whisper (★★★★★) was elated that the season-opener, the new production of La rondine, ‘illustrates to perfection what OHP does best’, adding that ‘in many ways the night belongs to conductor Matthew Kofi Waldren, spinning a sparkling City of London Sinfonia like a top’. The Guardian (★★★★) also showed admiration for ‘the City of London Sinfonia – brass especially – spirited and infectiously enthusiastic’.

WhatsOnStage (★★★★) crowned La rondine ‘a visual and musical feast’, and gave praise to ‘the ever-splendid City of London Sinfonia, whose annual residence is one of the company’s outstanding boasts, [who] played the score for all its worth under Matthew Kofi Waldren’s elegantly energised baton’, while the Daily Mail (★★★★) didn’t ‘expect to see anything much better this summer’.

In Don Giovanni, The Times (★★★★) announced that ‘[Dane] Lam’s general approach is invigorating… and the City of London Sinfonia plays vivaciously’, and WhatsOnStage’s (★★★★) reviewer turned up on a particularly weathersome night, remarking on the cast’s and orchestra’s resilience on a particularly ‘tempest-toss’d’ cruise ship: ‘gosh what a night….Opera Holland Park’s heroic stage company – and, especially, the splendid City of London Sinfonia under Dane Lam – carried on serenely while the audience adopted the brace position and clung for dear life.’

With the ‘gem-like orchestral colours’ (The Arts Desk) of La rondine, and a ‘great deal of musical panache’ (Limelight) in Don Giovanni, the Opera Holland Park 2017 Season has sailed to critical acclaim.

Photos © Stephen Thomas Smith for Opera Holland Park, 2017

More from the press

La rondine

The Guardian: ‘The chorus was on soaring form, the City of London Sinfonia – brass especially – spirited and infectiously enthusiastic. Conductor Matthew Kofi Waldren kept the tempi fluid and well paced. This was a buoyant start to a varied season.’

The Times (★★★★): ‘Everyone in Magda’s [Elizabeth Llewellyn] circle dreams of something, and the characterisation of the supporting ensemble… is a delight.’

The Arts Desk: ‘…what works here has most of the gem-like orchestral colours and vocal glamour it needs. Matthew Kofi Waldren is excellent at steering the deft mood-changes and easy lilt of the score…’

Bachtrack (★★★★): ‘Matthew Kofi Waldren drew a first-class performance from the City of London Sinfonia, revelling in the glorious froth and whimsy of the score, occasionally threatening to overpower the singers early on in the performance, but highlighting so much of the sweeping beauty and orchestral detail of Puccini’s writing that one could sit there and wallow in that alone.’

The Stage (★★★): ‘There’s lush support from the City of London Sinfonia under Matthew Kofi Waldren and the energetic Opera Holland Park Chorus.’

Seen and Heard International: ‘…the orchestration is magnificent and all credit to Matthew Kofi Waldren for coaxing the orchestra to its best…Dance rhythms were infectious; elsewhere, one heard a level of detail one might have considered unlikely given the quasi-outdoors setting…A special mention, too, for the leader, Martin Burgess and his various solos, all magical… In act three, Llewellyn and the orchestra conspired to provide moments of magic in her soliloquy as she reminisces.’

Daily Express (★★★★): ‘The City of London Sinfonia under Matthew Kofi Waldren gives a fine performance of Puccini’s evocative score.’

Financial Times (★★★★): ‘With two strong voices on the stage, conductor Matthew Kofi Waldren allows the City of London Sinfonia to raise its decibel levels above the average at Holland Park, and La rondine comes across as a more full-blooded opera as a result.’

The Independent (★★★★): ‘…a cast commandingly led by the charismatic Elizabeth Llewellyn, Matteo Lippi with his gorgeously Italianate bel canto, and Stephen Aviss as a flamboyantly camp and mellifluous poet. Direction by Matthew Kofi Walden is sure-footed, designs by takis are inventive.’

Don Giovanni

Classical Source (★★★★): ‘Dane Lam leads a very fleet account of the score, full of light and shade, with a beguiling propulsive quality about it; and there were many moments where the transitions between the orchestra and Stuart Wild’s admirable continuo (on piano) were seamless.’

Seen and Heard International: ‘Dane Lam and the City of London Sinfonia were firing on all cylinders throughout the performance’

Limelight (★★★★): ‘Lam…demonstrated a great deal of musical panache…The City of London Sinfonia obviously enjoy working with him and respond eagerly to his musical direction.’

The Stage (★★★): ‘…it’s in Dane Lam’s vital conducting and the clean-edged playing of the City of London Sinfonia that the performance shines most brightly’

Financial Times (★★★★): ‘In the title role, Ashley Riches has the elegance and swagger to make us believe in him to the bitter end, while Graeme Broadbent bellows authoritatively as the Commendatore.’

Evening Standard (★★★★): ‘In the pit, Dane Lam conducts firmly rather than elegantly, but the semi-open air acoustic allows occasional intrusions of birdsong — an effect that Mozart himself might have enjoyed.’

Culture Whisper (★★★★): ‘…this summery production of Mozart’s opera enjoys its comic potential from the outset’

Music OMH (★★★★): ‘Oliver Platt’s production for Holland Park not only succeeds in retaining the class system involved but, by being extremely innovative, delineates it to the full.’

City of London Sinfonia will be back in the Opera Holland Park pit in Kát’a Kabanová (starts 15 July) and Zazà (starts 18 July).

Our year in pictures – 2015

It was quite a year at CLS. We began 2015 with our Émigré series, full of music by composers who travelled the globe looking for fame and fortune, new artistic experiences, or just a safe place to call home. We did some travelling of our own when we visited Mexico in the spring, before setting up camp once again with Opera Holland Park over the summer. This autumn saw the beginning of our RE:Imagine series, which explores composers’ new interpretations and perspectives on existing works. Take a stroll with us down memory lane and see some of our highlights from 2015…

With the help of some brilliant cat gifs, we channelled our inner dancers for the tango-inspired CLoSer: To and From Buenos Aires. We also reminded ourselves just how weird cats can be!

The real dancers who joined us for the concert were brilliant, though!

 

In April, Russian-born New York composer and violist Ljova joined us for a special residency. He delighted us all with his beautiful blend of classical music, Russian folk, Klezmer and jazz, reflecting his own émigré roots. In anticipation of his arrival, we all thought up our favourite viola jokes…

Continue reading Our year in pictures – 2015

Month in Pictures – July and August

It’s been a busy few months at City of London Sinfonia. In July we announced our new RE:Imagine season, and preparations are in full swing for our first CLoSer event on 22 September. We had another wonderful summer with Opera Holland Park as their Orchestra-in-residence, and were very sorry to finish the season in August. Our community and education work has continued to keep us busy too, as we performed with Orchestras Live in Luton, and at Great Ormond Street Hospital. With all of that going on, it’s amazing we still found time for a trip to Brighton!

This year was our twelfth with Opera Holland Park, where we played Puccini’s Il Trittico, Verdi’s Aida, Delibes’ Lakmé, Montemezzi’s L’amore dei tre Re, and a new production of Jonathan Dove’s Flight. You can see more of Opera Holland Park behind the scenes here, or read about horn player, Mark Paine’s experiences. We were lucky to have the wonderful Robert Workman on hand for these wonderful photos.

Our partnership with Orchestras Live took us to Luton in July for the final concert in the Aiming Higher project, which gave young musicians the opportunity to play together and improve their skills. Composer John K Miles, who was commissioned to write the music for the project, told us all about his experiences working with young musicians in Luton. Here are some fab shots of all the groups in action.

We found some pretty cryptic messages during our time at Great Ormond Street Hospital. Remember – keep frogs alive!

It wasn’t all work, work, work this July and August; there’s also been plenty of fun in the office. Our favourite little mascot gave us the seal of approval on our new season, and we even managed to escape to Brighton for a day by the sea. Well, it is summer!

Mark Paine, CLS Horn Player talks OHP

2015 marks City of London Sinfonia’s twelfth year as Orchestra-in-Residence at Opera Holland Park, and we’re very sad that it all came to an end this weekend. In celebration of our collaboration with the festival, we caught up with one of our long-standing members, Mark Paine who has been with us from the very beginning.

We can’t believe it’s been 12 years since our (and your!) first production with OHP! What has been your favourite show over the years?

Yes this 2015 season is my twelfth at Opera Holland Park with CLS. I played in the orchestra’s first season back in 2004, starting with Bellini’s Norma, and I have played nearly every opera each summer since then. That makes 64 operas, averaging let’s say eight performances… bringing me to over 500 shows! Definitely a record of some sort. And it has been an absolute privilege and pleasure! I have been a part of some of the best music- and drama-making anywhere, and have been made, by the inspired owners James and Mike, to feel welcome at the very heart of the Opera Holland Park family. With 64 productions to choose from how can I single out one? If pushed I would have to say Janáček’s Káťa Kabanová back in 2009. But there are so many others I could mention. All of them have been in some way incredibly special, even ground-breaking.


From an orchestral musician’s perspective, what is the difference between performing on stage as part of a concert and in the pit as part of an opera?

Over the years I’ve been doing it, Opera Holland Park’s speciality has become the so-called verismo operas that burst while hot onto the Italian operatic scene in the early 20th century. Treading where no other opera company dares, OHP has unleashed onto the UK opera world six or so of these terrifying and unforgettable operas, to great acclaim. It has been wonderful to be a part CLS’s commitment to these spectacular undertakings, and literally to feel every one of us giving that little bit more, responding to the artistic challenge. CLS has matured as an orchestra by so doing.

What advice would you give to a CLS member who is embarking on their first production at OHP?

My advice to a CLS member embarking on their first production at OHP would be to take it incredibly seriously, to give it your absolute maximum. The rewards are rich and our contribution is noted and valued. It’s not just a lovely place to be on a summer’s eve; it’s something quite unique both professionally and personally.

Mark Paine and Joan Sutherland at Opera Holland Park, Summer 2009
Mark Paine and Joan Sutherland at Opera Holland Park, Summer 2009

And finally—any funny anecdotes?

My abiding memory of OHP… getting to meet the late Dame Joan Sutherland, who attended on crutches a performance that Richard Bonynge was conducting for OHP. I have been a fan of hers forever, and I managed to get some private time with her at the post-opera party. Desperate to talk to her about her legendary Lucia di Lammermoor triumphs, I had instead to let her tell me all about her beloved vegetable patch into which she had just fallen and broken both legs. But do you know it turned out better than I could have imagined – I got the true Joan, and a wonderful photo to treasure. Thank you OHP for everything.

Opera Holland Park so far…

We’re nearly to the end of this year’s season at Opera Holland Park and hasn’t it been a good one! In this post we’ve collected some of our favourite photos from our stint in the pit at our favourite open-air opera festival (nope, we’re not biased at all…), press quotes and tweets. And don’t worry – there is still time to catch a show before the season is over… just check out their website at operahollandpark.com for more information on their current productions.

Pics

The productions this year have been fantastic – it’s been great to be involved. Below our some of our favourite pictures of the various shows that have been on, including Jonathan Dove’s Flight, Verdi’s Aida and Puccini’s Il Trittico.

Continue reading Opera Holland Park so far…

The Life of a Concerts Manager…

Today we say a very sad goodbye to our amazing Concerts Manager, Becca Newman. Being the person in the office with the most contact with the players and (not by complete coincidence!) the one with the funniest, most bizarre stories, we asked her to write  a quick blog post about some of her favourite memories from her time here at CLS. From ironing Hugh Boneville’s shirt to singing naughty songs about toilets, the following is definitely recommended reading for anyone seeking an insight into the real life of a Concerts Manager and/or a quick Tuesday afternoon giggle! 

 

I’ve been asked to look back on my three and a half years at City of London Sinfonia and share some of my experiences with you. I’m not sure where to start – it’s been rather eventful!

In my time here, we’ve moved the office from Tower Hill to Brixton (and bemoaned the loss of our local Pret, but discovered the amazing culinary experience that is Brixton market), gained a new fantastic leader in Alexandra Wood, welcomed three babies and a lively adopted daughter within the Orchestra’s administration team, weathered three seasons of al fresco opera at Opera Holland Park, and gained rather more grey hairs than I would like to admit!

You don’t notice time passing when you’re busy and having fun, so reflecting on my time as Concerts Manager has come as a bit of a shock when I realise how much has changed since I started. There are some concerts that have become an annual event and help to punctuate the time – Opera Holland Park, the summer orchestral masses, Remembrance Service and Messiah at St Paul’s Cathedral and City of London Festival’s lovely lunchtime recital series in the new year. Then there are some of the crazier external private hire concerts that will stick in my mind for various reasons: managing Elaine Paige and Ruthie Henshall at a Gala Concert; two BBC Proms; and the Symfunny concert in aid of Parkinsons UK at the Royal Albert Hall where Armstrong and Miller sang their naughty song about train toilets accompanied by massed choirs BBC Singers, London Symphony Chorus and Brighton Festival Chorus, who gallantly tried not to corpse whilst singing some very naughty words!(C) James Berry

Other surreal and memorable moments often feature our Education Concerts, in particular, dressing up as an elf and wheeling Claire Henry (dressed as a Christmas tree) across Cadogan Hall stage in a giant box on wheels! I don’t think I’ll ever forget the epic Scott of the Antarctic Tour, a concert inspired by the memory of those who travelled to the most inhospitable and cold place on Earth, where we then got snowed in on the M11 on the way home after one of the concerts! I’ve ironed Hugh Bonneville’s shirt. I’ve spent 15 minutes lying on an orchestra pit floor underneath the Principal Cello with my arm in the air and holding a torch on their music as their stand light had broken and they couldn’t read it. I’ve even lent Simon Russell-Beale my iPad!

Looking after our conductors and soloists has been a privilege and a pleasure. I’m lucky: I get paid to meet and talk to my childhood heroes and idols! To name a few, I’ve worked with the likes of Sarah Connolly, Richard Rodney Bennett, Roddy Williams, Stephen Layton, Michael Rosen, the Hilliard Ensemble, Dame Felicity Lott and of course, our amazing Principal Conductor and clarinettist Michael Collins. One thing I’m thankful for however is I won’t be finding any more forgotten bananas, mushed up in the bottom of my bag, that I’ve bought for Michael and forgotten to give him pre-concert!

One reassuring constant though has been the unfailing support from a terrific bunch of musicians. Life as a freelance performer is incredibly busy. It involves a lot of juggling work, home life, commitments to many different organisations, working in a different venue / city every day, and not to mention transporting yourself, your instrument and your concert clothes around with you pretty much constantly. Simply for managing the aforementioned tasks, and before they’ve even begun to play, I feel they deserve a hearty round of applause (although some musicians are better at remembering their concert clothes than others…!)  Rehearsals and concerts are always made easier by such welcoming and warm players – and CLS are very lucky to have such musicians.  We talk a lot about the CLS family, and they really are like a family (or in some cases, actually are family. I’ve only recently discovered two of our regular extra violins are actually brother and sister despite working with them for three years!). The musical world is really very small, and I know that even though I will miss working with them as CLS, I will definitely be seeing many of them again in other orchestras and organisations – including my new home at the Royal Opera House! So, to my CLS family, if you ever find yourselves with time to spare in Covent Garden, please do call in for a cuppa and a catch-up!

 

Month in Pictures – August and September!

The last couple of months at CLS have seen the opening of our Shakespeare: Let Music Sound series this week, lots of education and community work (including the start of our Lullaby project with young children in Derbyshire), but mainly lots of burgers and lots of cake. Scroll down for some of our favourite moments!

 

In August, we headed off to Glasgow with Gwilym Simcock and our Principal Conductor and clarinetist, Michael Collins to perform Gwilym’s On a Piece of Tapestry in the City of Music at the UNESCO Commonwealth Games with New Music Biennial.

 

After our final performance at Opera Holland Park this Summer, our Concerts Manager, Becca had the glorious job of getting the scores ready to send back to the publishers. She found some hilarious markings in the parts, including an enlightening comment from the horn section making sure certain instrumentalists were still awake!

 

This beautiful picture was taken by our Chief Operating Officer, Elaine during a morning walk, marking the beginning of Autumn with low mist and frost. Get those woolly jumpers ready!

autumn arrives with mist and frost

 

Our musicians have been up and about doing lots of education and community work this month, including workshops for our Lullaby concert tour in Derbyshire (the picture where the musicians are wearing numbered hats!), First Time Live 2 legacy project in association with Orchestras Live and some concerts and workshops in Jewish Care homes as part of L’Chaim.

 

On Wednesday we opened the first of our Shakespeare: Let Music Sound Autumn concert series with a performance of Mendelssohn’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream in Southwark Cathedral with Holst Singers, baritone Neal Davies and actors Richard Hope and Emma Pallant. Here are some of our favourite snaps, if you want to see more, check out our Facebook page!

 

The team at CLS has had a bit of a change over the last few months as we’ve said a sad goodbye to our Development Manager, Ruth Mulvey and a temporary farewell to our Education Manager, Gillian who went on maternity leave. This, of course, along with the recent appointment of Nancy Hitzig, our new Philanthropy and Enterprise Manager, have been great excuses for cake, a cheeky game of ‘Guess the Baby’ and a new CLS tradition: Burger Friday!

 

In other news, our Marketing team have been talking about our CLS FIVER scheme for students and 16-25s at London Freshers Fairs, our Chief Executive, Matthew Swann, had an accident on his bike (for the record, this is not a “favourite moment”, just a memorable one!) and Elaine’s cute dogs, Dolly and Archie, spent a day lending a very helpful paw in the office!