Tag Archives: lullaby

Our year in pictures – 2015

It was quite a year at CLS. We began 2015 with our Émigré series, full of music by composers who travelled the globe looking for fame and fortune, new artistic experiences, or just a safe place to call home. We did some travelling of our own when we visited Mexico in the spring, before setting up camp once again with Opera Holland Park over the summer. This autumn saw the beginning of our RE:Imagine series, which explores composers’ new interpretations and perspectives on existing works. Take a stroll with us down memory lane and see some of our highlights from 2015…

With the help of some brilliant cat gifs, we channelled our inner dancers for the tango-inspired CLoSer: To and From Buenos Aires. We also reminded ourselves just how weird cats can be!

The real dancers who joined us for the concert were brilliant, though!

 

In April, Russian-born New York composer and violist Ljova joined us for a special residency. He delighted us all with his beautiful blend of classical music, Russian folk, Klezmer and jazz, reflecting his own émigré roots. In anticipation of his arrival, we all thought up our favourite viola jokes…

Continue reading Our year in pictures – 2015

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Month in pictures – September and October

We’ve had two very busy months at CLS. Our RE:Imagine concert series got off to a flying start in September with CLoSer: Debussy, Copland and Dance at Village Underground, and continued at Southwark Cathedral with an atmospheric celebration of the music of one of the most romantic cities in the world, in Venice: Darkness to Light. But that’s not all we’ve been up to so far this autumn. Take a look at some of our highlights of the last two months…

CLoSer: Debussy, Copland and Dance saw us return to the intimate setting of Village Underground with a programme exploring music written for dance from Rameau’s 18th century take on the classical Pygmalion myth to Copland’s evocative Appalachian Spring. The concert opened and closed with two brand new dance interpretations of Debussy’s Prélude à l’après-midi d’un faune by choreographer Tony Adigun, one contemporary classical, one urban. Photographer James Berry was on hand to capture the concert as it happened. Take a look at some of his stunning pictures…

Whether you missed the concert, or would just like to relive the evening, you can still watch short highlights on our website.

Our second RE:Imagine concert took us to the magnificent Southwark Cathedral to celebrate one of the world’s most wonderful cities, with Venice: Darkness to Light. Soprano Elin Manahan Thomas and countertenor Alex Potter joined us for JS Bach’s re-imagining of Pergolesi’s Stabat MaterTilge, Höchster, meine Sünden, and Latvian composer Ugis Praulins continued our theme of re-imagining the works of Bach, with his arrangement of movements from the Mass in B minor. Here are some lovely photos of rehearsals by James Berry.

On top of all that, it’s been very busy in the education department, as we returned to Suffolk and Essex for our annual Lullaby Concert tour and workshops with Orchestras Live. We also brought a Very Special Bear’s first concert to Warwick, Basingstoke and Saffron Walden with the help of the excellent Simon Callow, who was an absolute natural at conducting! Take a look behind the scenes to see us wrestling with balloons, and a lovely Paddington Bear card made by one of our younger audience members in Basingstoke!

Our RE:Imagine series continues in the new year with The Viennese Salon in the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse at Shakespeare’s Globe, and our next Crash Bang Wallop! family concert will take place on 12 December. We hope to see you there!

Crash Bang Wallop! Let it Snow
Saturday 12 December 2015, 11.00am
Cadogan Hall, 5 Sloane Terrace, London
Tickets: £8 Children, £10 Adults, £30 Family (four tickets)
Box Office: 020 7730 4500 / cadoganhall.com

The Viennese Salon
Sunday 24 January 2016, 2.00pm
Sam Wanamaker Playhouse, Shakespeare’s Globe, London
Tickets: £62 (premium), £15 – 48, £10 (standing)
Box Office: 020 7401 9919 / shakespearesglobe.com

Month in Pictures – October and November!

This Autumn has been a jam-packed season for us at CLS, with our concert series, Shakespeare: Let Music Sound, and lots of education work, including our Lullaby concert tour and Youth Takeover project in association with Orchestras Live in Spalding (we recently worked out that the Orchestra spent an astonishing 86 days in the community this quarter!). In other news this season, we are delighted to have announced Dame Felicity Lott as our new Patron and were thrilled to have her perform two private recitals for CLS Friends at Blain|Southern, preceding her involvement with our outreach projects in Tower Hamlets and Harrow during the next coming weeks. For some of our favourite moments from the time so far, just scroll down!

 

Our Autumn concert series, Shakespeare: Let Music Sound, celebrated Shakespeare’s 450th anniversary through a variety of concerts weaving together play text, live acting and music inspired by the Bard himself. Some of our favourite snaps from the season can be found below, including pre-concert naps, the watchful eye of the Bard himself and the remains of our  librarian’s (slightly hectic!) preparations for our performance of Shostakovich’s Hamlet at Village Underground. To find out more about our next concert seasons, Émigré visit our website.

 

A highlight of our Autumn programme was Last Train to Tomorrow, a performance to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the Kindertransport, presented by our friends at the Association of Jewish Refugees at the Roundhouse. A number of the Kinder (the name given to the survivors of the Kindertransport) were in attendance at the concert, as was HRH The Prince of Wales, who has long championed their cause. The audience consisted of the Kinder’s own children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren and other supporters.

 

On 12 November we hosted an exclusive CLS Friends event at Blain|Southern art gallery with CLS leader, Alexandra Wood, Principal Conductor and clarinettist Michael Collins and Dame Felicity Lott. As her first public performance with us as CLS Patron, Felicity was on brilliant form and we hope those of you who joined us enjoyed the evening! Alongside some comedic arias and repertoire by Spohr, the headline piece was Schubert’s Shepherd on the Rock, a piece that Michael and Felicity first performed together 30 years ago!

 

As part of our longstanding partnership with Orchestras Live, our education team were in Spalding last month working alongside Youth Takeover, a group of young producers resident at South Holland Centre to present a concert based on a unique concept. Working with CLS musicians and composer John K Miles, local young musicians and bands curated a concert calledLifetime – redefining the concert experience’. It was fantastic project to be involved in, and the culminatory concert on 26 November was brilliant. A huge well done to all involved!

 

Our education team have been all around the country this term, with our Lullaby concert tour to Suffolk in October, workshops with Freshwater’s Academy,  and lunchtime concerts at St Thomas’ hospital, London. As you can see, some of the props went slightly crazy at times, and even made their way into the office!

 

Lullaby Tour Suffolk 2014

During the last week of October, our education team went on a week-long tour of Suffolk and Essex for this year’s Lullaby Concert tour organised in collaboration with Orchestras Live. Beginning in Clacton-on-Sea and ending in Stowmarket, Suffolk, the concerts—presented by Claire Henry, animateur—aimed to bring first time live orchestral music experiences to some of the most under-served areas across England. According to recent figures, we are delighted to say that we reached over 1200 young people in 12 concerts!

Centred on the theme of ‘The Enchanted Forest’, Claire and City of London Sinfonia musicians took the young audience on a musical journey using a combination of music-making and engaging story-telling (which included instruments being stuck on the musicians’ heads, magical jars full of music and a beautiful dancing ballerina!). Performing a range of classical pieces including Debussy’s Prélude à l’aprèsmidi d’un faune and Dukas’ Sorcerer’s Apprentice, the concert was presented in a way that encouraged lots of audience participation and interaction, after a series of workshops in the area.

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As you can see, some of the kids were very cute, particularly when, at the end of each concert, there was also an opportunity for them to have a go on some orchestral instruments!

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A huge thanks to everyone involved and for Paul Coghlin for taking these amazing pictures! To see all of the photos, please visit the Orchestras Live website. To read more about our Meet the Music programme please visit our website.

Like the look of this? Why not try our regular Crash Bang Wallop! family concerts? 

Crash Bang Wallop! Christmas Star 
Saturday 13 December 2014, 12 noon
Cadogan Hall, London
Tickets: £10 Adult, £8 Child, £30 Family of 4

Month in Pictures – August and September!

The last couple of months at CLS have seen the opening of our Shakespeare: Let Music Sound series this week, lots of education and community work (including the start of our Lullaby project with young children in Derbyshire), but mainly lots of burgers and lots of cake. Scroll down for some of our favourite moments!

 

In August, we headed off to Glasgow with Gwilym Simcock and our Principal Conductor and clarinetist, Michael Collins to perform Gwilym’s On a Piece of Tapestry in the City of Music at the UNESCO Commonwealth Games with New Music Biennial.

 

After our final performance at Opera Holland Park this Summer, our Concerts Manager, Becca had the glorious job of getting the scores ready to send back to the publishers. She found some hilarious markings in the parts, including an enlightening comment from the horn section making sure certain instrumentalists were still awake!

 

This beautiful picture was taken by our Chief Operating Officer, Elaine during a morning walk, marking the beginning of Autumn with low mist and frost. Get those woolly jumpers ready!

autumn arrives with mist and frost

 

Our musicians have been up and about doing lots of education and community work this month, including workshops for our Lullaby concert tour in Derbyshire (the picture where the musicians are wearing numbered hats!), First Time Live 2 legacy project in association with Orchestras Live and some concerts and workshops in Jewish Care homes as part of L’Chaim.

 

On Wednesday we opened the first of our Shakespeare: Let Music Sound Autumn concert series with a performance of Mendelssohn’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream in Southwark Cathedral with Holst Singers, baritone Neal Davies and actors Richard Hope and Emma Pallant. Here are some of our favourite snaps, if you want to see more, check out our Facebook page!

 

The team at CLS has had a bit of a change over the last few months as we’ve said a sad goodbye to our Development Manager, Ruth Mulvey and a temporary farewell to our Education Manager, Gillian who went on maternity leave. This, of course, along with the recent appointment of Nancy Hitzig, our new Philanthropy and Enterprise Manager, have been great excuses for cake, a cheeky game of ‘Guess the Baby’ and a new CLS tradition: Burger Friday!

 

In other news, our Marketing team have been talking about our CLS FIVER scheme for students and 16-25s at London Freshers Fairs, our Chief Executive, Matthew Swann, had an accident on his bike (for the record, this is not a “favourite moment”, just a memorable one!) and Elaine’s cute dogs, Dolly and Archie, spent a day lending a very helpful paw in the office!

October in Pictures

After a manic October, we’ve finally had a chance to catch our breath and bring you the highlights from the past month. In the last four weeks, we’ve completed the second leg of our Fauré Requiem Cathedrals tour, enjoyed some stunning orchestral jazz in our Hot Tunes/Cold War series, watched 1920s Soviet propaganda and traversed the Suffolk coast with our Lullaby concert tour. From Village Underground in Shoreditch, to Paddy’s Wigwam in Liverpool, our seemingly nomadic musicians have battled falling trees, gale-force winds and, er, really bad traffic jams.

queen_elizabeth_hall_auditorium

Ok, so this was technically September, but the impressive Queen Elizabeth Hall in the Southbank Centre played host to Music from across the Iron Curtain, the first concert of our Hot Tunes/Cold War series.

HTCW

Our Hot Tunes/Cold War series explored music influenced by the political events leading up to and during the Cold War, examining the development of jazz culture from the early 1920s and its effect on classical music against the backdrop of the turbulent political events of the mid-20th century.

Cathedrals October 2013 004

Our Cathedrals tour began in Coventry’s epic Cathedral, with Stephen Layton conducting the Orchestra and the Cathedral choir.

Cathedrals October 2013 054

The beautiful Guildford Cathedral was the location of the first of two Come and Sing events, which offered singers the opportunity to sing Tallis’ majestic Spem in Alium.

CLoSer

We returned to the ever-atmospheric Village Underground for the next installment of our CLoSer series: a screening of Kozintsev’s The New Babylon with the Orchestra providing the score.

017_D8E0033_Lullaby Concert, Ipswich, Oct 2013_LOW-RES (P Coghlin)

Our musicians react in a measured and mature way to Haydn’s Symphony No. 94 (the “Surprise” Symphony) during our Lullaby tour.

The Lullaby Tour October 2013

We are incredibly proud of our Meet the Music outreach initiatives, one of which is our Lullaby Concerts tour which occurs twice a year.  Lullaby concerts bring classical music to children in areas where live orchestral music is a rarity. This series is run in partnership with Orchestras Live, and provides an interactive way of introducing young children (typically under 6) to classical music.

I’m sat in a town hall in Suffolk jam-packed with preschool children and their parents, when a labcoat-clad Claire Bloor appears astride an orange spacehopper, wearing a single yellow glove and brandishing a long green balloon. Moments like this are wonderful reminders that working in the arts is exciting, surreal and, crucially, fun.IMG_0855

The theme of October’s tour was “The Mad Professor” and featured Claire, our wonderful Animateur in Residence, playing the part of an eccentric scientist who tries to build instruments for the Orchestra members. However, this was not just a children’s show with an orchestra in the background. The Orchestra themselves are always complicit in the fun; they have costumes of their own and spend the concert teasing Claire and larking around for the children’s amusement. Claire, seemingly, has boundless energy, making the children (and adults) laugh with delight as she took them through the musical programme. The fact that she is nothing more than a labcoat-wearing blur in eighty percent of the photos I took of her is a further testament to her dynamism (rather than to my poor photography skills).

IMG_0839I caught up with Claire, Gillian (our Education Manager) and our musicians in between concerts, to ask them about what Lullaby means to them and find out about their own childhood experiences of classical music.

AJ: Why is it important to introduce very young children to classical music?
Gillian Hunter: Kids this age don’t have any preconceptions about genres of music, nor are they old enough to worry about what is ‘cool’ – all they hear is music. This is an opportunity for them to be exposed to high quality playing of real repertoire in an environment they wouldn’t normally expect to find it!

AJ: What’s the best thing about Lullaby?
Mark Paine: It’s a lot of fun for the kids, and they get to see exactly how these instruments are actually played – it teaches them about the mechanics of it.

AJ: Is the transition from formal concert playing to these more informal children’s concerts difficult?
Susan Dorey: Not at all! We are, after all, entertainers, and this is just another element of working in the entertainment business!IMG_0857

AJ: What were your first experiences of classical music?
MP: Hearing the pipe organ in church, and being told my legs were too short to play!

CB: When I was five, a girl in my school assembly played the flute and I thought it was the most beautiful thing (probably because it was shiny). I pestered my parents for one and they gave me a recorder instead, which I promptly turned on its side. Eventually they bought me a real flute!

MP: Initially my school in Australia didn’t have a music programme until a new music teacher arrived and wanted to start an orchestra. He gave me a horn to take home over the weekend to try out. By Monday I had figured out how to play a scale and the rest, as they say, is history.

GH: My first experience was a bit mad – my parents signed me up for the Suzuki violin program before I was born! It was so oversubscribed that you had to get in there early to get a place.075_Thurrock, Lullaby Concert_high-res (Paul Coghlin)

AJ: What’s been your favourite Lullaby moment to date?
MP: Talking to the fish during the April 2013 tour.

CB: This tour, it’s when the new instruments come on and I get really excited. Last time, it was wearing flippers and kicking my legs in the air!

But don’t just take our word for it! Have a look at our video from one of last week’s concerts to get a sense of the fun for yourself.

More information about our Lullaby tours, upcoming events, our Community and Education work and our Community Partners can be found on our website.

Retrospect: The Last Month in Pictures

As we approach the Easter holiday weekend, we take a look back at the last month in what has been an inspiring winter of music, despite the miserable weather! Here’s what we have been getting up to in February and March…

CLoSer CLoSer

Our first CLoSer of the year took place at Village Underground featuring Schnittke’s Moz-art à la Haydn, the winner of our social media audience choice. Saxophonist Tim Garland also performed Kancheli’s Night Prayers and new piece, Songs to the North Sky.

CBW 2 9 Mar 2013 Becca Newman

We also returned to Cadogan Hall for 2013’s first Crash Bang Wallop! concert, which this time focused on Stephen McNeff’s musical retelling of the Tale of Squirrel Nutkin. Here the orchestra rehearse before the children arrived for their day of craft and music making!

First Time Live EBaines

FTL Harlow

We took another successful First Time Live project to Harlow, performing in Harlow Leisure Zone after a series of workshops with 11-14 year-olds, giving them the chance to not only experience live orchestral music, but create it!

COLF feb concert credit becca newman

As part of the City of London Festival, our series of lunchtime winter concerts continued. Here our viola soloist, Fiona Bonds, rehearses in St. Andrews Church, Holborn, where she performed Woolrich’s Ulysses Awakes.

Lullaby Thurrock credit Gillian Hunter

Our animateur in residence, Claire Bloor, performs in our Lullaby concert series in Purfleet. To find out more about our education and welfare projects, read our Meet the Music blog.

Steve and Becky low res

It’s not all hard work: Steve and Becky, two of our players, enjoy some friendly competition on their lunchbreak!

Images: James Berry, Becca Newman, Gillian Hunter, Paul Coghlin & Elaine Baines

Catch up with Meet the Music

Flashback: Meet the Music
Making a racket at one of our Lullaby workshops

It’s been an extremely hectic time for our Education team and musicians over the last couple of months, with numerous Meet the Music activities taking place. Here’s a flavour of what’s been going on…

Last weekend saw the success of another much-loved Crash Bang Wallop! concert at Cadogan Hall and while the leitmotifs of Stephen McNeff’s Squirrel Nutkin still  rattle around our heads, we are already looking ahead to the turn of Little Red Riding Hood when we return on the 11th May. In the mean time, however, our Meet the Music education team’s schedules are far from quiet…

First Time Live participants from the last project in Luton
First Time Live participants from the last project in Luton

This week sees our musicians partake in their final workshop for First Time Live at Harlow, which will culminate in the production of a concert on 21st March, completely engineered by Harlow’s finest, budding orchestra managers and composers! Under the expert guidance of our presenter, John K. Miles, and principal conductor, Michael Collins, our role in this project enables a group of brave young teenagers, who live in areas lying in the bottom 20% for levels of arts engagement, an opportunity to access, and be a part of, a live orchestral concert experience.

Turning our attention to a slightly younger audience, our Lullaby programme will this week be making a final visit to Clacton-on -Sea. Thanks to generous funding from Barnardo’s, we are able to take a quintet of musicians into three nurseries in Jaywick this Friday, followed by two interactive family concerts on Saturday, featuring excerpts from The Nutcracker and including our very own young ballerina! Next stop will be Purfleet and Under the Sea!

CLS Quartet performs at St Joseph's Hospice
CLS Quartet performs at St Joseph’s Hospice

But we don’t just take care of the little people… as part of our Wellbeing through Music programme, we also have an upcoming visit to the residents of St Joseph’s Hospice, Hackney, next week. We are excited about developing more opportunities to work with St Joseph’s over the next few months, including a potential composition project we have in the pipeline. We will also be performing at Guy’s Hospital on the 24th April (a lunchtime concert open to the public) and our players continue their  weekly visits to the children and families of Great Ormond Street Hospital and Evelina Children’s Hospital, bringing music as respite to those who need it the most.

Find out more about our Meet the Music Programme.