CLS presents Absolute Bird

What can you experience in Absolute Bird?

Absolute Bird is a London concert series like no other. Sure, we want our audiences to experience incredible live performances of exciting, inspiring and thought-provoking music by our musicians and guest artists, but we also want them to be part of the performances; to help us create sweeping soundscapes of birdsong and nature.

We’re creating a soundscape together—a way of experiencing the music that you wouldn’t normally get.

What’s unique about our concert series?

We’re making the concerts in Absolute Bird unique in a number of ways: there are three very different formats, we’re playing with the space in each of the halls; there’ll be musicians dotted around the place, there’ll be live broadcasts in, and we’re playing very different music right from early medieval music right up to the present day.

At Southwark Cathedral, we’re offering ‘Free as a bird’ tickets that encourage our audience to join in and have fun; to experience live classical music in a nontraditional way. It’s something a bit different; a bit unusual.

Just as we do in the work we might do in a school or a hospital or a care home, where we’re inviting people in those environments to create music with us, we’re inviting the audience to create the experience with us.

How can audiences be part of the performances?

When you turn up on Friday 3 May at the Queen Elizabeth Hall for Sounds of the Outback, one of the first things we’re going to ask you to do is help us create an Australian soundscape. Then, when you turn up to Southwark Cathedral a couple of weeks later for Flocks of Europe, we’re going to ask everyone – audience, musicians, artists, but perhaps not the Cathedral cat – to be flocks of birds.

But “how?”, we hear you wonder. We’ll do all this using recordings of birdsong and calls related to the music we perform in each concert. For Sounds of the Outback, it’s Australian birds from all over the country such as pied butcherbirds, common blackbirds, laughing kookaburras and eastern whipbirds. For Flocks of Europe, it’s flocking birds from the British Isles, including cuckoos, nightingales and hens.

Translating Nature (Friday 24 May) is completely different, and full of variety through its three events. There is a chance to learn, a chance to sit back and relax to a mixed-tape programme, and there’s a chance to do some late-night fun with nightingales. It’s a three-part mini-festival of nature and music.

When are the concerts and where can you book tickets?

You can book your tickets for our Absolute Bird concerts on our website at cls.co.uk or by phone at 020 7621 2800 (Monday-Friday, 10am-6pm). Tickets for Queen Elizabeth Hall performances are also available at the Southbank Centre Ticket Office via their website at southbankcentre.co.uk or on 020 3879 9555.

  • Sounds of the Outback: Friday 3 May 2019, 7.30pm, Queen Elizabeth Hall
  • Flocks of Europe: Wednesday 15 May 2019, 7.30pm, Southwark Cathedral
  • Translating Nature: Friday 24 May 2019, 8pm, Queen Elizabeth Hall
    • Pre-concert Talk with Miranda Krestovnikoff: 7.00-7.40pm
    • (Late night!) Singing with Nightingales Live with Sam Lee: 10.00-11.15pm

CLS presents Absolute Bird

For more information on our May series, you can listen to our podcast on SoundCloud, Apple Podcasts, Spotify and other podcast providers. You can also keep up to date at #AbsoluteBird on Twitter or by joining our Facebook events.


Absolute Bird is supported using public funding by the National Lottery through Arts Council England, and by David and Molly Lowell Borthwick, The John S Cohen Foundation, Derek Hill Foundation, John Ellerman Foundation and Kirby Laing Foundation.

Advertisements